Low-Impact, Secure Medical Equipment Deployment in Critical Hospital Settings

Imagine this: A technician is working within the NICU unit of a Midwestern hospital. As he begins uploading patient monitoring software in one of the rooms, the patient and her family are ushered in. The family is visibly distraught. During this very private, devastating moment, the technician must make a series of decisions. Should he stay and continue uploading software? Should he offer condolences to the family? What if someone asks him for a drink of water from the sink behind his ladder? If he must stay in the room to complete a critical software upload, what does he need to do to remain professional?

In a situation such as this, both the manufacturer of the equipment being installed and hospital personnel are highly invested in the behavior and demeanor of the installer. The consequences of a technology installer’s performance and its impact on the patient experience can be serious— even life-threatening.

Installing, maintaining and upgrading technological devices within critical medical settings is an art, and not every technician can provide the soft skills needed. This article offers insights and a checklist to help ensure low-impact technology deployment in medical institutions.


Workplace Violence: Policy + Plan + Practice = Prevention

Over the space of 24 hours in September 2018, the people of Maryland suffered three unrelated violent workplace events at a software company, a municipal building and a distribution center. Lives were lost, and businesses were disrupted in profound ways. It was a grim reminder of an apparent rising rate of workplace violence. Many companies, perhaps yours included, now have workplace violence plans in place – or do they really?

If you have a plan, no matter what industry you are in, chances are it’s not enough. Read on to find out what you are probably missing and learn how to confidently protect your employees and customers. Is it worth your time to analyze your plan and make adjustments? Because lives could be at stake, we suggest it is.


McDonald’s Point of Sale Refresh

OVERVIEW:

Prime Communications was engaged for a nationwide refresh of the Point of Sales Systems (POS) for two Enterprise clients which included both corporate and franchisee owned McDonald’s and Kentucky Fried Chicken locations. Prime Communications resources and expertise combined with their project management process and procedures were needed to execute this nationwide technology deployment.

CHALLENGES:

The major challenge that Prime faced was the need to keep the stores operational during normal working hours as it was important to avoid lost revenue. The locations varied from major metropolitan areas to remote rural areas which created a logistical challenge. The timelines to kick off the overall project and complete it were very short. For example, Prime was tasked with upgrading 400 Kentucky Fried Chicken locations in less than four months. As a result, Prime created a plan that did not interrupt store operation and ensured the assigned locations were covered in a timely manner with the proper amount of trained technicians on hand.


Prime Communications, Inc. Joins the LPF as a New Partner

Matthews, NC (September 21, 2018) – The Loss Prevention Foundation (LPF) announced its newest Associate Level Partner, Prime Communications, Inc. The Associate level partnership secures numerous LPQ and LPC certification course scholarships for Prime to distribute to industry professionals.

Headquartered in Elkhorn, NE and founded in 2001, Prime Communications, Inc. (PCI) provides enterprise leaders with high-performance infrastructure, physical security & network solutions. PCI was recently named to the SD&I’s Fast 50 List as a top systems integrator and is committed to delivering custom engineered security and network solutions.


Top 4 Reasons Structured Cabling is Critical Infrastructure

It’s every IT director’s nightmare: phone calls come in from end users saying the system is causing problems. The CEO is depending on today’s teleconference for a large sale, but individual work stations are having trouble even loading spreadsheets. Is it a network security breach? Software and hardware was recently updated, so what could the problem be? One common answer is this: the cable plant.